Thursday, February 18, 2016

Thoughts on Psalm 119:27

27 Make me understand the way of Your precepts;
So shall I meditate on Your wonderful works.


Notice the bold, yet humble request. There’s no groveling here.


Make me understand.


It takes humility to admit that you don’t know something. It’s actually having a self confidence that isn’t wrapped up in “having all the answers.”


It is very important to admit to ourselves that we don’t know everything about God and about His ways. Even when we’ve had amazing encounters and experiences, heard His voice and His heart about certain things.


Jesus retains the capacity to astonish us, to reveal new aspects of His character, His desire, His love.


I think what this translates to is this: Just because you aren’t comfortable with something doesn’t mean it isn’t from God. God is bigger than your comfort zone.


So shall I meditate on Your wonderful works.


Meditation is a key to understanding God’s ways. Again - this isn’t “emptying your mind” but rather filling your mind with the word of God - with those things God is highlighting to you out of the Bible. It’s more than just memorizing verses, but imagining those verses, and especially imagining yourself in those verses.


Many times I have walked with David out into the valley to face Goliath.
I’ve exchanged a skeptical glance with Peter when Jesus said “who touched Me?” while being nearly crushed by a crowd.
I’ve sat with Abraham as he sent his servant to go find his son a wife, and then went on the trip.


And I am convinced that there is not, nor will ever be, a Hollywood hundred-million dollar blockbuster movie that will ever compare to the word of God, mixed with your imagination, being empowered and enlightened by the Holy Spirit.


And as you meditate on His word, as it becomes alive and as real as a personal memory - you discover something:  His works are wonderful.


O Lord, how great are Your works!
​​Your thoughts are very deep. Psalm 92:5


Scripture taken from the New King James Version®. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson. Used by permission. All rights reserved.