Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Thoughts on Psalm 20:1b


May the name of the God of Jacob defend you (Psalm 20:1b)


David is singing in Psalm 20 about “The Day of Trouble” - and he is laying out God’s provision, which can be summed up in the word “Trust.”


As an aside, the word “Psalm” comes from the Greek psallein - “to pluck” and further psalmos - “song sung to harp music” So as you listen to the music I’ve written for Psalm 20, realize that this is how the Psalms are meant to be experienced - sung with a stringed instrument.


First, we find Trust in the fact that God will speak to us - He will answer us and give us direction. (see Psalm 20:1a)


David then draws on his personal walk with the Lord and takes us deeper into God’s provision for the Day of Trouble: the fact that God’s name will defend you. So we go to David’s most famous story: David and Goliath (1 Samuel 17)


I’ve tried to watch a few movie versions of David and Goliath, but unfortunately I am now one of “those people” who has “read the Book” and I haven’t been able to finish any of them. No matter how well it is done, it is sub-par to the theater of my imagination as I have poured over the details of this miraculous story.


David didn’t just grab a stone and run out to meet Goliath. There was actually a spiritual battle that took place first. Goliath took the first swing, when:


And [Goliath] cursed David by his gods. 1 Samuel 17:43


Isn’t it interesting that a giant who had a clear physical advantage still took the time to apply a spiritual element? Something to ponder.


David was unphased. He fired back:


“You come to me with a sword, with a spear, and with a javelin. But I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts…This day the Lord will deliver you into my hand… for the battle is the Lord’s, and He will give you into our hands.” 1 Samuel 17:45, 46, 47


And you know the rest of the story. Israel’s “Day of Trouble” turned out to be one of the most celebrated Biblical stories ever.


And it was settled when David spoke to his problem, and told his problem how the end would turn out - and he did it in the name of the Lord.


So again, we find the psalmist - not flippantly throwing around flowery words - but making a withdrawal out of the treasuries of a life lived, walking with God; fully aware of the power of releasing the name of the Lord into any situation.


And how much more - now that we know the Lord not only by His name “the God of Jacob”, but by the name of Jesus?

May the name of the God of Jacob defend you


Scripture taken from the New King James Version®. Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson. Used by permission. All rights reserved.